Run. Hill. Repeat. @HospitalHillRun #RunReal

I ran the Hospital Hill Run Re-Run this past weekend. I raced a 5K on Friday night, then did the Half Marathon as a progression run on Saturday morning.

My current goal race is a marathon in late August. Coach Kyle (http://kylekranz.com/coaching/) suggested I use this 5K to assess fitness at this point in my training, but not race the half the next day. It was really hard to not race a race!

I warmed up for the 5K with a full lunge matrix and two miles of easy running. That was a first for me as well – I haven’t raced a lot of 5Ks, but for my first one I didn’t warm up much at all; for the second one I did do about a mile of easy running. I thought the extended warmup was pretty valuable, and it certainly didn’t wear me out.

I ran a 21:13, pretty far off my PR of 19:59, but that came on a much flatter course. There are calculators you can use to figure out what you would have run on a flat course, if that makes you feel better, or you’re trying to compare apples to apples with a prior race. I used this one:( http://www.runworks.com/calculator.php) which yielded an adjusted time of 20:42. Credit to Tim Noakes, whose book “Lore of Running” is the basis of these calculations. You can also use these calculators to predict your time at other distances using your established fitness level from a recent race. Another fascinating adjustment is altitude – I train at 1000 ft. here in Kansas City. My August marathon is at 2000 ft., so it looks like I’ll give up about 2 minutes for that. However, I’m excited to be running a virtually flat race course, which I’ve never really done before.

You can go crazy with these calculators. I considered the elevation change the most significant factor. If you adjust for temperature (anything over 60F pushes your time up) my already adjusted time goes down to 20:12. If you further adjust that 20:12 down to sea level, it drops to 20:07. My advice: don’t talk yourself into a PR with these calculators! Most of us train and race in the same geographic area.

Here’s some photos from the 5K (not all of them (edit: none?) flattering…)

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As a forefoot/midfoot striker, I’m happiest running uphill, flat, or very gradual downhill. Even at this short distance, I was doing tortoise and the hare with some heel strikers – I’d motor past them on the uphills, then they’d come pounding past me on the downhills. I didn’t get caught on any flats – including the finish stretch. I won my age group!

The next day, I ran the half as a progression run. Or swim. The skies opened about 4:20 am, and it rained all through the race, even delaying the start a half hour due to concerns about heavy rain and lightning. It was a good call by the race director, and we still got to run. The rain backed off for the race start, poured about a half hour in, then came down pretty steady the rest of the time I was out there. Hard rain but no lightning. I tried to run the first 7 at an easy pace – my target was 9:00, but pride, excitement, or just feeling good that morning had me pushing down into the 8’s before long. I ran miles 8-10 in the 7:30 range. The last three were supposed to be at a FAST effort – but it was hard to gauge if I was achieving that based on numbers only. The Broadway hill starts around mile 10, and it’s a long up. That pushed my pace down a bit until the final short but steep Trinity Hill just past mile 12. I cranked it down to close to around 7:00 for the final mile, with a 6:00 pace sprint for the final 0.2.

I suppose I’d prefer rain to sun and heat, but to tell the truth I don’t look all that happy in these race photos:

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As you can see, I wore my Skora FIT for both races. It’s just such a great all-purpose shoe it’s hard to take it off! If the course had been flatter I might have gone with the lighter CORE or PHASE, which I’ve raced in before, but this wasn’t a goal race so I went with the increased cushioning of the FIT.

Final thought: the air temp was 70F and I was passing people running in disposable ponchos virtually the whole race. Maybe they were on their way to a weigh-in. If not, I hope they were hydrating! I’m sure they weren’t that much drier than I was at the finish!

 

Why are you running? @HospitalHillRun

What’s your motivation? What is going to get you moving and keep you moving through the finish line at Hospital Hill? I recently finalized a decision about my purpose in running Hospital Hill. You may have made yours a long time ago! A movie I watched recently (The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner – from the 60s, but now a Broadway play) made me think how running needs a purpose, and you need to internalize that purpose, even if it didn’t originate in you. It doesn’t have to be specific, or even terribly significant. However, if you aren’t running with a purpose, you might not keep moving!

Here’s a brainstormed list of 10 reasons why you might be running – add yours!

  1. To share the experience with my friends or family (or family who are friends, etc.).
  2. I’m in it to win it.
  3. In memory of a loved one who loved running.
  4. I want to PR.
  5. For a charitable cause.
  6. I have a time goal I want to break.
  7. Just for fun – I love to run with others.
  8. To reward myself for the training miles I’ve put in with some nice swag.
  9. As a tune-up for another race.
  10. To jump-start a commitment to fitness.

I’m going to do the new “Re-Run,” and I have a different purpose for each race. I’m going to use the 5k as a time trial to see where I’m at right now with my fitness level. The next day, I’m not going to “race” the half; instead I am going to run it as a progression run – cranking up the pace as I go. I’m going to have fun too – see you out there!

Goal setting before, during and after your race. @HospitalHillRun

Only a runner would understand the response “well, I have three” in response to the question, “what’s your goal for this race?”

I always have three pace goals for a race: 1) the “reach for what you cannot,” pie-in-the-sky goal – what I train towards. I’ll be ecstatic if I ever hit this one; 2) the more realistic goal – what I think I should be able to achieve on that day; 3) the fall-back goal – the “it’s not my day, but I’m going to take something away from this race” goal.

For instance, during last Saturday’s Garmin Marathon, these were my three goals: #1 BQ minus 1:30 (probably sufficient to get into 2015). #2 BQ at under 3 hours, 15 minutes. #3 just finish (given that I had just run the Boston Marathon on Monday, I had a fairly forgiving fall-back goal).

I realize that two marathons in six days is probably not a recipe for success for marathon #2. However, I felt really great at Boston, recovered quickly, and decided to go for it at the last minute. I went out ahead of the 3:15 pace group and stayed on my pace for 8-9 miles. However, due to some GI distress Friday and race morning, I was feeling pretty lousy by the time I saw the RHSW and one of my sons and College and Woodland. I said “I’m thinking about bailing out.” At this point, my pace was slowing by about 30s. I was shifting gears pretty quickly from goal #1, to #2, and then #3.

I hung on to my lead on the 3:15 pace group until about mile 17 or so. By group, I mean the solo pacer who was staying on pace, and everyone who started with him well behind. I made him a pace group again and ran with him for a few miles. We talked about Boston and I expressed how I just wasn’t feeling that great, it wasn’t my day, but I had resolved to finish today. The way he put it is, “sometimes you just have to make it a mental race.” I appreciated that. I was already in that place – with my numbers goals a fading memory, at least I knew that I had fought through the tough miles where I had to convince myself to keep going despite the urge to stop. Anyhow, I was fading and he was staying on pace so I let him go.

Sometimes you get to set new goals during your race. Around mile 21, I found a new goal. Or I should say, the goal found me. I had been hearing some footsteps, fairly close to matching my cadence. So I guessed, it’s either a minimalist runner or a female (i.e., shorter stride length from height, not foot strike). It was the latter. It was her first marathon, and she was doing great but wanted someone to run with those final 5 miles. I was more than happy to try to help pick her pace back up (thereby picking myself up). We ran together to the finish, with me babbling encouragement and being a course tour guide the whole way. She finished 2nd overall female. Nice debut! I came in at 3:18:19 – which was 1:51 slower than my Boston time earlier that week. I’m glad I ran it though – because it reinforced the lesson that if you have several goals, you are bound to meet one or two of them and take away something positive from the day!

If you can smile at the finish line of Hospital Hill, you’ve accomplished two goals!

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After your race, it’s time to re-evaluate and set new goals. Always have a new goal!

 

Will you taper or peak? @HospitalHillRun

What’s in a name? When you’re training for a race, those last few weeks before a race on a training schedule often get the name “taper.” I’m tapering for my spring marathon right now (Ok, it’s Boston. There, I said it. Boston Boston BOSTON!!! Whew. Sorry, I’m extremely excited – it’s my first!).

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Here’s a photo of my friend John and I (I’m on the left, unable to resist making eye contact) running a leg of the cross-country fundraising relay “One Run for Boston 2.” Please consider donating to the One Fund for victims of last year’s bombing through this organization. John ran last year’s race and was in the Forum Restaurant with his family when the bombs went off. We’re both running it this year.

Anyhow, tapering conjures up all kinds of images of slacking off, backing down, fidgeting, etc. Yes, it’s literally true to the extent that you need to back off on the mileage. Any training schedule worth its salt will have a peak mileage week several weeks out from a race, followed by one to three weeks of lower mileage. This can be a source of anxiety for anyone who’s been pushing it, feeling good, and is looking forward to the challenge of a race. Multi-month training schedules have cutback weeks all through them to give you a chance to heal. The “taper” is your last chance to heal up before the big day – don’t waste it.

I’ve heard the term “peaking” substituted for the taper a few times. I like it. It conjures up an image of a roller coaster. You’ve been flying along, going up and down hills and you come to the last big up before a downhill push to the finish. You’re going fast but you’re slowing as you near the top of the final big hill. There’s plenty of momentum to take you over the peak. The coaster has already done all the hard work to get to that point. Push too hard and you just might fly off the rails!

Peaking is getting your body to that sweet spot of conditioning where you are ready, but not exhausted. Better undertrained than overtrained, so they say. You’re not going to improve your fitness with a 20 miler the week before your big race. I’ve read that it’s okay to hit your goal pace in your “peaking” weeks – cutting back on mileage doesn’t mean you shouldn’t give good effort.

It’s encouraging and it feels good to be hitting your pace at lower mileage in those last few weeks. I feel ready for Boston – like I’m peaking, not slacking. I’m looking forward to that great race and then transitioning into getting ready for another – Hospital Hill!

“Just” Running

I used to hate running. More precisely, I used to hate “just” running. Now I love “just” running – what changed? Me, the calendar, my perspective, how I run.

I’m really glad to have the opportunity to blog about running and training for the Hospital Hill Run, a great race with great tradition – 41 years worth! Road running giants have raced these same streets that you and I will tread in June, just under 3 months from now.

I used to dread running as a means to an end – it wasn’t the goal – playing soccer, losing weight, those were the goals. Even though I never really completely stopped running, it wasn’t until after I had my first real injury in my late 30s that I appreciated it. After a year without running and with the addition of many pounds, I faced my 40th birthday wondering if I was ever going to be able to run regularly again. I’ve now run multiple half marathons, marathons and even an ultra or two – all on the far side of 40. I’m really looking forward to running the Boston Marathon this April – my first!

I’m living proof that minimalism isn’t just a fad – even if shoe companies try to convince you that “maximalism” is in. I switched to barefoot/forefoot striking a couple of years ago. It’s not for everyone, but the switch put the joy back into my running. I have run in a variety of minimal shoes over the past few years and I’ve settled on a favorite: Skora – a Portland, Oregon based company that asked me to be an ambassador last year. Now I run because I enjoy “just” running – the joy is in the run now that just running is the goal! I finally appreciate it for itself.

This is one of the most inspiring times of the year to recommit to running. It’s been a bleak winter, but as spring explodes around us everywhere in warmth, green, and birdsong, focus on the joy of “just” running!

My top three tips for training:

1) Follow a training plan

2) Train on the course whenever you can – your weekend long run is best

3) Incorporate some exercises to strengthen your core

Happy running!

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